Art

Showing 27 posts tagged Art

generic-art:

5-Year-Old With Autism Paints Stunning Masterpieces 

Autism is a poorly-understood neurological disorder that can impair an individual’s ability to engage in various social interactions. But little 5-year-old Iris Grace in the UK is an excellent example of the unexpected gifts that autism can also grant – her exceptional focus and attention to detail have helped her create incredibly beautiful paintings that many of her fans (and buyers) have likened to Monet’s works.

Little Iris is slowly learning to speak, whereas most children have already begun to speak at least a few words by age 2. Along with speech therapy, her parents gradually introduced her to painting, which is when they discovered her amazing talent.

“We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking,” her mother, Arabella Carter-Johnson, explains on her website. “Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other.”

(via pawsupdicksout)

jonathanmoore:

Advice For Designers

“I think you should always do more than what people ask for. Or we should not only look for what they ask for, but what they would like to do if they had the courage to ask for it.”

by Hartmut Esslinger, the founder of the legendary design firm Frog Design

SANAA proposes transparent spheres for nobel headquarters

SANAA‘s proposal for the nobel center headquarters in stockholm, sweden, features six transparent spheres of varying proportions crafted to reflect the city’s undulating skyline. designed to serve as both a place of learning and an site of relaxation, the ‘nobel sphere’ competition entry would form a new civic forum for the region, open to the public all year round.

Naked Bodies

When French photographer Olivier Valsecchi won the Hasselblad Masters Award in 2012, he was asked by the camera-maker to create a new set of photos that represented one word: “evoke.” The result of that abstract brief is Klecksography, a photographic reimagining of the inkblot test.

Born in Paris in 1979, Valsecchi composed music as a teen and began to take an interest in visual arts while creating pictures to illustrate his own record sleeves. He later enrolled in photography school to refine his techniques, and his work has been exhibited around Europe, the US, and Asia. After winning a Hasselblad Masters award for his stunning portrait series Dust, he created Klecksography.

"The artistic concept of the series was to make human sculptures, the technical concept of the series was to make photo montages without digital manipulation," Valsecchi explains. "What you see is what you get on my camera’s screen. It took at least three hours to make each photo."

"The first job was to cast people who looked alike. Then I showed them their respective positions, placed everyone on the stage, and the game could start. They had to strike a pose for several minutes while I was yelling at everyone to move very slowly, up or down, left or right, to be symmetrical with the opposite side."

Artist Creates 88 Mind-Bending Versions of a Hotel

Munich’s Deutscher Kaiser hotel looks like any sleek modern building. But re-imagined through the mind (and lens) of artist Víctor Enrich, the structure becomes something mind-bendingly crazy — Salvador Dali meets Inception.

The Spanish native spent months turning out these 88 startling computer-aided distortions of the four-star urban lodging. Why? Recent emigrant Enrich had passed the Deutscher Kaiser daily while job-hunting in the German city and quickly tired of looking at it. What started off as novel way to motivate himself, turned into a fully realized passion project.

Speaking to TIME from Barcelona, Enrich says “I always try to express myself as much as I can. If I’m not having fun, I will never do anything!”

We’ve picked some of our favorites, but you can see Víctor’s full series here.